Passion for Prosecco

Learn About Prosecco

NOT All PROSECCOS ARE CREATED EQUAL.

Prosecco’s home is in postcard-beautiful northeast Italy, in between the sunny Adriatic Coast to the East, romantic Venice in the South and the breathtaking Dolomite mountains to the North. Tourists flock to this welcoming area and Italians have summer homes dotting the hills. And true to its home, Prosecco is known throughout Italy as “The Welcome Wine.” All are refreshing, with a food-friendly low alcohol content (around 11%). But for hundreds of years, the wines from the hills have commanded a premium, prized for their combination of refreshing lightness and yet complexity of flavor. Mionetto’s wines all reflect their hilly heritage.

WHAT IS PROSECCO?

The Glera grape, formerly known as Prosecco, originated during Roman times and is one of the oldest grapes in Italian history. Its origin and name can be traced back to the town of Prosecco in Trieste. The grapes are transformed into sparkling wine using the Charmat method in which stainless steel tanks and yeast are utilized to produce a natural second fermentation. The process takes approximately 60 days depending on acidity, residual sugar and pressure. The Charmat method allows Prosecco to preserve its original flavors and perfumes longer. Prosecco is traditionally a dry wine with hints of apple and citrus.

WHERE DOES PROSECCO COME FROM?

Prosecco’s home is in postcard-beautiful NE Italy, in between the fun-filled Adriatic Coast to the East, romantic Venice in the South and the breathtaking Dolomite mountains to the North. Tourists flock to this welcoming area and Italians have summer homes dotting the hills. And true to its home, Prosecco is known throughout Italy as “The Welcome Wine.” All are refreshing, with a food-friendly low alcohol content (around 11%). But for hundreds of years the wines from the hills have commanded a premium, prized for their combination of refreshing lightness and yet complexity of flavor. Mionetto’s wines all reflect their hilly heritage.

Some of the Glera grapes

THE RIGHT SLOPE

But not just any slope will do. For protection from the prevailing cold alpine winds and icy rains from the North, vines are on Southern slopes. And SE slopes are best. They face the morning sun, benefiting from the early sunlight and a morning jolt of CO2, needed for sugar production.

The varied slopes of the Prosecco D.O.C.G. area

A CONTINENTAL CLIMATE

Sensuous warm, dry summers, bracing cold winters, hot days/cool nights, clearly defined spring & autumn. Altitude defines personality: Peachy, fruity softness from the gentle plains, to more bracing styles from the cooler, higher slopes.

VITICULTURE

More mechanization and higher yields in the flatlands. Just look for a quality producer like Mionetto, who oversee their vines carefully from budding to harvesting.

SAME GRAPE, DIFFERENT NAME

“Prosecco” used to refer both to the wine and the grape. Now, the grape is “Glera,” the area “Prosecco.” As in Champagne, producers in the Prosecco region want to protect their 300 years of tradition and offer a guarantee of quality. So, outside the Prosecco appellation, you are making a “Sparkling Glera.”

SOIL

Because each wine is the liquid picture of a place, the wines from the gentle, more fertile flatter areas are rounder and softer. On the slopes, where the topsoil is poorer and roots need to dig deep, the wines are more minerally and tightly-structured.

TOPOGRAPHY: THE SECRET IS IN THE SLOPE

The poorer the soil, the lower the yield, the harder and more expensive the work (up to 10 times the cost compared to the flatlands!) But, those same vertiginous slopes provide better drainage (grapes, like humans, don’t like wet feet), extra frost protection and extra cool. Similar to skiers who slalom in a T-shirt during the day and huddle by the fire at night, grapes flourish with the warm days and cold nights. The extra-long growing season adds complexity and preserves acidity – a must-have for a food-friendly wine like Prosecco.